Jr Gold Forum

JR GOLD FORUM – SILVER GOLD EXCHANGE

Jr Gold Forum

jr gold forum

    forum

  • (in an ancient Roman city) A public square or marketplace used for judicial and other business
  • Forum is a Bangladeshi English language monthly current affairs magazine. Founded in 1969 in the then East Pakistan (present day Bangladesh) by human rights activist Hameeda Hossain and economist Rehman Sobhan, the magazine became renowned for its outspoken content advocating democracy and
  • a public meeting or assembly for open discussion
  • A place, meeting, or medium where ideas and views on a particular issue can be exchanged
  • Forum is an album by Australian guitar pop group Invertigo. The album was released in 2001 with some songs (such as “Desensitised” and “Chances Are”) recorded in 2000.
  • A court or tribunal

    gold

  • An alloy of this
  • made from or covered with gold; “gold coins”; “the gold dome of the Capitol”; “the golden calf”; “gilded icons”
  • amber: a deep yellow color; “an amber light illuminated the room”; “he admired the gold of her hair”
  • A yellow precious metal, the chemical element of atomic number 79, valued esp. for use in jewelry and decoration, and to guarantee the value of currencies
  • A deep lustrous yellow or yellow-brown color
  • coins made of gold

    jr

  • A name suffix, in the Western English-language naming tradition, follows a person’s full name and provides additional information about the person. Post-nominal letters indicate that the individual holds a position, educational degree, accreditation, office or honour.
  • Junior (in names)
  • Junior: a son who has the same first name as his father
  • younger: used of the younger of two persons of the same name especially used to distinguish a son from his father; “John Junior”; “John Smith, Jr.”

jr gold forum – Nikon Coolpix

Nikon Coolpix S8100 12.1 MP CMOS Digital Camera with 10x Zoom-Nikkor ED Lens and 3.0-Inch LCD (Gold)
Nikon Coolpix S8100 12.1 MP CMOS Digital Camera with 10x Zoom-Nikkor ED Lens and 3.0-Inch LCD (Gold)
Fast, responsive and versatile, the Nikon Coolpix S8100 digital camera with advanced CMOS sensor technology and incredible 10X zoom will capture fast-moving subjects in still images and Full HD (1080) movies. High-speed operation, exceptional low-light performance, outstanding image quality and sophisticated features mark the 12.1-megapixel S8100. The optical 10x wide Zoom- NIKKOR ED glass lens covers 30-300mm, and the camera’s speedy start-up, fast autofocus, quick shutter release, superior low light performance and high-speed continuous shooting (five shots in one second!) ensure capture of all your memorable moments. The Nikon Coolpix S8100 digital camera also offers Optical VR Image Stabilization, high ISO sensitivity to 3200, a new flash control system, movie recording with stereo sound and a 3-inch Ultra-High Resolution (921,000-dot) Clear Color Display for bright, sharp image viewing and sharing. Order the Nikon Coolpix S8100 digital camera today! Whats in the box – Supplied with AN-CP19 Strap; UC-E6 USB Cable; EG-CP16 Audio/Video Cable; EN-EL12 Rechargeable Li-ion Battery; EH-68P Charging AC Adapter; COOLPIX Software Suite CD-ROM.

Japan Society Building

Japan Society Building
Turtle Bay, Manhattan

The headquarters of Japan Society, earlier called Japan House, is located in the Turtle Bay section of Manhattan on the north side of East 47th Street, close to First Avenue and the United Nations. Founded in 1907, Japan Society functions as a cultural and educational institution, as well as a forum for dialogue between Japanese and American business leaders. Junzo Yoshimura, a leading Japanese architect during the second half of the 20th century, was responsible for the building’s handsome horizontal design, in partnership with George G. Shimamoto, of the firm Kelly & Gruzen. In addition to being Yoshimura’s only work in New York City, this building is likely to have been the city’s earliest permanent structure designed by a Japanese citizen. A life-long resident of Tokyo, Yoshimura was closely associated with the Rockefeller family throughout his career; he built an exhibition house in the garden of the Museum of Modern Art in 1954, as well as two structures at the Rockefeller estate in Pocantico Hills.

John D. Rockefeller 3rd was president of Japan Society from 1952 to 1978. He and his wife Blanchette Rockefeller donated the site and likely played an important role in Yoshimura’s selection as architect. Yoshimura started to prepare his design in 1967 and construction was completed in 1971. While some of Yoshimura’s earlier American projects followed Japanese tradition, for this building he pursued a more contemporary approach, re-interpreting familiar Japanese elements in such industrial materials as bronze and painted concrete. His elegant yet restrained charcoal-colored design was praised and received a “Certificate of Merit” from the New York Society of Architects in 1972.

In the 1990s, Beyer Blinder Belle supervised a sensitive renovation and expansion of the building that added a fifth story on 47th Street but left much of Yoshimura’s original plan intact. Japan Society is a conspicuously serene work of late modernism. In a city where buildings often compete for attention, Yoshimura’s muted design is remarkably timeless, reflecting Japan’s unique architectural heritage and the Society’s mission to serve as a venue for international exchange.

FINDINGS AND ANALYSIS

Japan Society

Japan Society was established in May 1907 during a visit by Japanese General Baron Tamesada Kuroki to promote “friendly relations between the United States and Japan” and to provide a “more accurate knowledge of the people of Japan, their aims, ideals, arts, sciences, industries, and economic conditions.” The Society was part of a broader trend reflecting increased American interest in, and contact with, Japan. New York City’s Japanese population increased gradually during the second half of the 19th century, reaching more than 1,000 in 1900.

To serve this community, several organizations were formed, including the Japanese Christian Institute, the Nippon Club, and the Japanese Mutual Aid Society. Initially, Japan Society’s activities were of a social nature; it published books on Japan and organized events, such as luncheons and lectures at the Hotel Astor (demolished) in Times Square, where a roof-top Japanese garden and teahouse were installed in 1912. Many notable New Yorkers served on the original executive committee, including Stewart L. Woodford, Jacob H. Schiff, August Belmont, and Seth Low.

Membership in the society reached 1,300 in the 1920s. To help support “educational work,” an endowment was created with substantial contributions from Japanese donors. Interest, however, declined during the Depression years and activities ceased in response to Japan’s attack on Pearl Harbor. A formal peace treaty between the United States and Japan was signed in San Francisco in September 1951.

John D. Rockefeller 3rd (1906-78), eldest son of John D. Rockefeller Jr. and Abby Aldrich Rockefeller, was in attendance and was elected president of a revived Japan Society in March 1952. Four years later, he founded Asia Society and the two organizations would occupy an elegant International Style building – known as Asia House – that Rockefeller financed at 112 East 64th Street (now the Russell Sage Foundation, part of the Upper East Side Historic District). Located between Park and Lexington Avenues, the $1.168 million building was designed by Philip Johnson. Faced with dark glass, the 1959 structure featured offices, an auditorium, and garden.

Planning a new headquarters

Japan Society quickly outgrew Asia House. With a staff of ten and approximately 1,500 members, outside facilities were frequently needed for weekly meetings, educational programs, and storage. Executive director Douglas W. Overton wrote in May 1965:

In short, the Japan Society barely has adequate space to maintain its current program and any further development in our activities would appear to be impossible until this problem is solved.

In an assessment of present and future needs, Overton made a strong case for erecti

Japan Society

Japan Society
Turtle Bay, Manhattan, New York City, New York, United States

The headquarters of Japan Society, earlier called Japan House, is located in the Turtle Bay section of Manhattan on the north side of East 47th Street, close to First Avenue and the United Nations. Founded in 1907, Japan Society functions as a cultural and educational institution, as well as a forum for dialogue between Japanese and American business leaders. Junzo Yoshimura, a leading Japanese architect during the second half of the 20th century, was responsible for the building’s handsome horizontal design, in partnership with George G. Shimamoto, of the firm Kelly & Gruzen. In addition to being Yoshimura’s only work in New York City, this building is likely to have been the city’s earliest permanent structure designed by a Japanese citizen. A life-long resident of Tokyo, Yoshimura was closely associated with the Rockefeller family throughout his career; he built an exhibition house in the garden of the Museum of Modern Art in 1954, as well as two structures at the Rockefeller estate in Pocantico Hills.

John D. Rockefeller 3rd was president of Japan Society from 1952 to 1978. He and his wife Blanchette Rockefeller donated the site and likely played an important role in Yoshimura’s selection as architect. Yoshimura started to prepare his design in 1967 and construction was completed in 1971. While some of Yoshimura’s earlier American projects followed Japanese tradition, for this building he pursued a more contemporary approach, re-interpreting familiar Japanese elements in such industrial materials as bronze and painted concrete. His elegant yet restrained charcoal-colored design was praised and received a “Certificate of Merit” from the New York Society of Architects in 1972.

In the 1990s, Beyer Blinder Belle supervised a sensitive renovation and expansion of the building that added a fifth story on 47th Street but left much of Yoshimura’s original plan intact. Japan Society is a conspicuously serene work of late modernism. In a city where buildings often compete for attention, Yoshimura’s muted design is remarkably timeless, reflecting Japan’s unique architectural heritage and the Society’s mission to serve as a venue for international exchange.

FINDINGS AND ANALYSIS

Japan Society

Japan Society was established in May 1907 during a visit by Japanese General Baron Tamesada Kuroki to promote “friendly relations between the United States and Japan” and to provide a “more accurate knowledge of the people of Japan, their aims, ideals, arts, sciences, industries, and economic conditions.” The Society was part of a broader trend reflecting increased American interest in, and contact with, Japan. New York City’s Japanese population increased gradually during the second half of the 19th century, reaching more than 1,000 in 1900.

To serve this community, several organizations were formed, including the Japanese Christian Institute, the Nippon Club, and the Japanese Mutual Aid Society. Initially, Japan Society’s activities were of a social nature; it published books on Japan and organized events, such as luncheons and lectures at the Hotel Astor (demolished) in Times Square, where a roof-top Japanese garden and teahouse were installed in 1912. Many notable New Yorkers served on the original executive committee, including Stewart L. Woodford, Jacob H. Schiff, August Belmont, and Seth Low.

Membership in the society reached 1,300 in the 1920s. To help support “educational work,” an endowment was created with substantial contributions from Japanese donors. Interest, however, declined during the Depression years and activities ceased in response to Japan’s attack on Pearl Harbor. A formal peace treaty between the United States and Japan was signed in San Francisco in September 1951.

John D. Rockefeller 3rd (1906-78), eldest son of John D. Rockefeller Jr. and Abby Aldrich Rockefeller, was in attendance and was elected president of a revived Japan Society in March 1952. Four years later, he founded Asia Society and the two organizations would occupy an elegant International Style building – known as Asia House – that Rockefeller financed at 112 East 64th Street (now the Russell Sage Foundation, part of the Upper East Side Historic District). Located between Park and Lexington Avenues, the $1.168 million building was designed by Philip Johnson. Faced with dark glass, the 1959 structure featured offices, an auditorium, and garden.

Planning a new headquarters

Japan Society quickly outgrew Asia House. With a staff of ten and approximately 1,500 members, outside facilities were frequently needed for weekly meetings, educational programs, and storage. Executive director Douglas W. Overton wrote in May 1965:

In short, the Japan Society barely has adequate space to maintain its current program and any further development in our activities would appear to be impossible until this problem is solved.

In an assessment of present and future need

jr gold forum

jr gold forum

Bounty Hunter QUICKDRAWII Quick Draw II Metal Detector
Bounty Hunter’s Quick Draw II detector offers the excitement and profit of metal detecting at a moderate price–it’s feature rich but still affordable. With a fully submersible, 8-inch Bounty D-Tech search coil, Quick Draw II also has Ground Trac, a feature that automatically balances the machine to the soil conditions. The Quick Draw II has four modes of operation, ranging from an all-metal detection to the Disc Notch mode that rejects iron and nails and two modes that emit different tones for varying kinds of metal. The detector’s display gives both target ID and depth readout, controls for the four modes of operation, and a low-battery indicator. Users will also enjoy Bounty Hunter’s comprehensive, easy-to-understand online tutorial and downloadable manual at http://www.detecting.com. The Quick Draw II has a built-in speaker and headphone jack and runs off of two 9-volt alkaline batteries. Five-year limited warranty.

Bounty Hunter’s Quick Draw II detector offers the excitement and profit of metal detecting at a moderate price–it’s feature rich but still affordable. With a fully submersible, 8-inch Bounty D-Tech search coil, Quick Draw II also has Ground Trac, a feature that automatically balances the machine to the soil conditions. The Quick Draw II has four modes of operation, ranging from an all-metal detection to the Disc Notch mode that rejects iron and nails and two modes that emit different tones for varying kinds of metal. The detector’s display gives both target ID and depth readout, controls for the four modes of operation, and a low-battery indicator. Users will also enjoy Bounty Hunter’s comprehensive, easy-to-understand online tutorial and downloadable manual at http://www.detecting.com. The Quick Draw II has a built-in speaker and headphone jack and runs off of two 9-volt alkaline batteries. Five-year limited warranty. –Ariel Meadow Stallings